ISCAS 2002

IEEE International Symposium

on Circuits and Systems

Sunday, 26 May 2002 - Wednesday, 29 May 2002

Scottsdale Princess Resort

Scottsdale, Arizona

ISCAS 2002 Theme: Circuits and Systems for Ubiquitous Computing







 






Floating-Gate Devices, Circuits, and Systems
Paul Hasler
Bradley A. Minch
Sunday May 26, 2002, 8:30 AM - 4:45 PM

Abstract:

Floating-gate devices and circuits have been one areas of considerable interest within Circuits and System's society, as seen by the considerable recent interest in recent conferences and journals. An increasing attention on floating-gate circuits and systems has resulted in a number of interesting techniques and new floating-gate circuits. Floating-gates are well established as non-volatile digital memory, and floating-gate circuits are becoming established in the research community as a useful parameter bias storage and a useful technique in developing digital and analog circuits. Recent research has shown

  • that floating gate techniques may be applied in any CMOS process,
  • the feasibility of making analog memory-structures and with increased precision,
  • the ability of post-fabrication circuit tuning,
  • the implementation of families of floating-gate amplifiers and filters, and
  • that small circuits are capable of continuous-time adaptation simultaneously with computation.

Recently, there has been increasing attention on floating-gate technology applied towards systems has resulted in a number of interesting new applications in signal processing and control. Further, the capabilities of the floating-gate circuits will ultimately be seen from their application in systems; therefore there is becoming increasing interest in system development using floating-gate circuits or using floating-gate circuits within systems.

The aim of this workshop is to encourage researchers to explore some of the available floating-gate techniques and possibly initiate some new ideas of floating-gate applications. The emphasis of this workshop will focus on experimental techniques, because the feasibility of floating-gate systems involves a number of known problems where techniques for storing charge on the floating gate must be combined with workable circuits. This workshop will address several aspects of floating-gate circuits:

  • Analog memory structures
  • Analog Floating-gate programming techniques and reliability
  • Circuits using floating-gate structures
  • Circuit tuning using floating-gate structures
  • Modeling floating-gate circuits
  • System blocks built using floating-gate circuits
  • Modeling system-level floating-gate circuits

We will have multiple expert presentors on floating-gate devices, circuits and systems at this all day workshop: Tadashi Shibata, Tor Sverre Lande, Jaime , Gert Cauwenbergs, Jeff Dugger, Paul Smith, and Matt Kucic..


About the Presenters:

Prof. Paul Hasler (phasler@ece.gatech.edu): Paul Hasler received his B.S.E. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from Arizona State University in August 1991. He received his Ph.D. degree in Computation and Neural Systems from the California Institute of Technology in June 1997. Dr. Hasler is currently an Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His research interests include investigations of floating-gate devices, circuits, and systems, developing cooperative approaches between analog and digital signal processing as a focus towards single-chip and multichip solutions, investigating adaptive biological and silicon systems, intelligent interfaces between neurobiology and silicon, and investigating and modeling the solid-state physics of floating-gate devices and high-field carrier transport. He received the Electron Devices Society's Paul Rappaport Award in 1996, and an NSF Career Award in 2001. Dr. Hasler is a member of Tau Beta Pi, a member of Eta Kappa Nu, and a member of the IEEE.


Prof. Bradley A. Minch (minch@ece.cornell.edu): Bradley A. Minch received his B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering with distinction from Cornell University in May 1991. He received his Ph.D. degree in Computation and Neural Systems from the California Institute of Technology in June 1997. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Cornell University. His research interests include low-voltage/low-power analog and digital integrated circuit design, translinear circuits, log-domain filters, floating-gate MOS circuits and systems, adaptive circuits, and neuromorphic circuits and systems. He received the Electron Devices Society's Paul Rappaport Award in 1996, and an NSF Career Award in 2000.

 
The 2002 IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems is sponsored by:
 
    
and supported by:
Texas Instruments
 
IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENTS
Date     Announcement
    6 March     Preliminary conference schedule available. See "Program" area of website.
    29 January     Session information for accepted papers is now available.
    19 January     The list of accepted papers has been posted. Please see the Paper Submission page for the link.
IMPORTANT DEADLINES
Tutorial Proposal Deadline         Friday, 21 September 2001
Paper Submission Deadline         Monday, 29 October 2001
Paper Acceptance Notification         Friday, 18 January 2002
Author Registration Deadline         Friday, 1 March 2002
Final Submission Deadline         Friday, 1 March 2002
 
 
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